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1   / News and Comment / Re: Some facts and figures
 on: Aug 16th, 2019, 9:13am 
Started by JohnW | Post by WG  
Agreed Delboy-the january publication reflects the december index. Thanks for the correction.....so lets have a massive pre-xmas leap in inflation then nil inflation from january onwards.   Embarrassed

2   / News and Comment / Re: Some facts and figures
 on: Aug 15th, 2019, 11:31pm 
Started by JohnW | Post by Delboy  
Make that December (unless they've moved it without telling me)WG wrote on Aug 15th, 2019, 8:41am:
Interesting-these figures were obviously not used when calculating the recent 20% rise for BBC staff?

Meanwhile the most that BBC Pensioners can hope for is 2.8% unless the index goes up big time in january?


3   / News and Comment / BBC music archive
 on: Aug 15th, 2019, 5:10pm 
Started by chris west | Post by chris west  
A musician friend would like information about archive material or documentation available from Radio One Sessions and Radio One Club Live from the late 60s and 70s. Anyone any ideas about where to point him? Thanks everyone......

4   / News and Comment / Re: Some facts and figures
 on: Aug 15th, 2019, 11:51am 
Started by JohnW | Post by JohnW  
Since it's beginning to look like some of the world's big economies may be about to go into recession, I wouldn't hold your breath for any improvement by January, especially since our new PM is about to go to the G7 to meet up with Donald Trump. [Just imagine what trouble those two might cook up together!]

It seems that the bad news coming from China, Germany, the UK and the US has adversely affected the stock markets, as trade between the two biggest economies (China and the US) has plunged, severely affecting those suppliers of US goods (ranging from medical equipment to soy-beans) which will ultimately threaten US jobs. So, although Chinese imports of US goods in July fell some 19% from a year earlier, its exports to the United States declined just 6.5%. I wonder if this is 'Trump economics' at work??? No wonder they seem very keen to get the UK to sign a trade deal.

Investment Managers BlackRock are clear about what they think is driving the troubles.
“The recent escalation in US-China trading tensions reinforces our view that geo-political friction - including the effects of Brexit - has now become a key driver of the global economy and markets” they said in a statement released on Monday.

5   / News and Comment / Re: Some facts and figures
 on: Aug 15th, 2019, 8:41am 
Started by JohnW | Post by WG  
Interesting-these figures were obviously not used when calculating the recent 20% rise for BBC staff?

Meanwhile the most that BBC Pensioners can hope for is 2.8% unless the index goes up big time in january?

6   / News and Comment / Some facts and figures
 on: Aug 14th, 2019, 11:22am 
Started by JohnW | Post by JohnW  
I see that today, the ONS have released their figures for the annual RPI and CPI rates.
They continue to confuse us (well, me at least!) with much 'splitting up' of the data ... so I shalln't attempt to dissect further.

The main movements for CPI in July 2019 are:
• The all items CPI is 107.9, unchanged from last month.
• The all items CPI annual rate is 2.1%, up from 2.0% in June.
• The annual rate for CPI excluding indirect taxes, CPIY, is 2.1%, up from 2.0% last month.
• The annual rate for CPI at constant tax rates, CPI-CT, is 2.0%, up from 1.9% last month.
• The CPI all goods index is 105.1, down from 105.5 in June.
• The CPI all goods index annual rate is 1.7%, up from 1.5% last month.
• The CPI all services index is 111.2, up from 110.6 in June.
• The CPI all services index annual rate is 2.5%, unchanged from last month.

As for RPI (the one we BBC Pensioners are concerned with!)

The main movements for RPI in July 2019 are:
• The all items RPI is 289.5, down from 289.6 in June.
• The all items RPI annual rate is 2.8%, down from 2.9% last month.
• The annual rate for RPIX, the all items RPI excluding mortgage interest payments (MIPs), is 2.7%, down from 2.8% last month.
• The all goods RPI is 216.8, down from 218.3 in June.
• The all goods RPI annual rate is 2.2%, up from 2.0% last month.
• The all services RPI is 401.3, up from 399.0 in June.
• The all services RPI annual rate is 3.5%, down from 4.0% last month.

Quite which of these RPI rates they'll be using for Pension 'increments' is anyone's guess - although I'm sure they'll choose to use the lowest!!

Deep joy to all.

7   / News and Comment / RTÉ licence
 on: Aug 2nd, 2019, 5:37pm 
Started by Administrator | Post by Administrator  
According to "TVB Europe", here,

"Ireland drops TV licence for new ‘broadcasting charge’.

Charge will apply to all households who use tablets, laptops and other devices to watch content."

RTË report the story, here.

"The Government has agreed to replace the traditional TV licence fee with a new "device independent broadcasting charge".

It was announced by Minister for Communications Richard Bruton as part of a major reform of the TV licence fee system.".

8   / News and Comment / Re: Where has Prospero online gone?
 on: Aug 2nd, 2019, 3:53pm 
Started by Delboy | Post by Delboy  
Looks like they've forgotten to add the link on the 'my pension' site for August's Prospero (as of Aug 2nd) so here it is:
http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/mypension/en/prospero_august_2019.pdf

9   / News and Comment / Re: BBC to save £4.5M over 3 by scrapping staff buses?
 on: Jul 31st, 2019, 10:15am 
Started by Dickie Mint | Post by JohnW  
Mike - that would have been Henry Wood House.
I remember that game well - until someone got wise to it and they took away the metal item that people were using (as you describe).
Then there was the Egton underground car park: Wasn't the "official" way to get in there by using a token (if there were any to be had)?

I seem to remember that Geno (of blessed memory!) found a way to get you SwC guys into the underground car park - where only "Top Management" and Radio Cars were supposed to go!!

Personally, I go back slightly farther, and remember that post 17:30 pm when the offices emptied we were allowed to park (using an official card!) on top of what was "the bunker" (prior to them erecting BHXX on top of it!
In the late 60s, for an evening shift we'd cruise Portland Place for an empty space (this was before the meters were made too expensive to use!) but if none could be had, then we would park up in Regent's Park (if you could find a free space (not that you had to pay, but there weren't physically any empty spaces!) and 'leg it' down to BH. Once it got to about 17:20 pm then you'd request a relief and dash up to collect your vehicle and wait for your opportunity. All this meant that come the end of evening shift you didn't have to trudge up to collect your car and drive home at 22:30!

Security did get tightened up considerably once the Cash Office got raided through the back door (which gave out onto the carpark) and then they eventually decided to close that one altogether and installed a couple of ATMs up in old BH near to the back lifts (at the front of the building!).

The BH Carpark was also available on Saturdays and Sundays (very few office workers around!) but you had to time your arrival right on those mornings so as to catch the outgoing nightshift's spaces! But that was a dicey event as the Maintenance shifts were also using the spaces - and they changed over at 08:00 - which meant there was often a queue on Duchess Street with cars waiting for an available space!! Many a time you had to watch as the oncoming shift's replacement was sitting in his/her car waiting to get into the carpark!!  Good times they were.

10   / News and Comment / Re: BBC to save £4.5M over 3 by scrapping staff buses?
 on: Jul 31st, 2019, 9:24am 
Started by Dickie Mint | Post by Mikej  
When I worked in BH Switching Centre, we on late shifts got a car park pass under whatever that tall building with BBC other side of the church (my old brain forgets name of building!) The pass was actually an exit one so you could enter with no pass and on the far side of the barrier was kept a convenient metal milk crate which, when placed on the sensors, thought it was a car coming in so opened the barrier without a pass so one could simply drive out! Of course replacing the crate inside for others to use! Smiley